An Approach to Entitlement Spending and Unemployment

The United States currently owes $14.7 trillion. The estimated population of the United States is 311,264,255, so each citizen’s share of this debt is $47,235.03. The National Debt has continued to increase an average of $3.96 billion per day since September 2007. I ask you to support corporate and income tax reform, cuts to wasteful spending and entitlement programs and a balanced approach to our runaway spending.

However, how do we get there? How do we handle runaway entitlement spending and record unemployment?

We must advocate a different allocation of our funding. We should cancel entitlement programs and replace them with works programs.

I know this may sound shocking. I consider myself a moderate Democrat, but a Democrat nonetheless. The idea of dramatic changes to entitlements sounds scary, but hear me out.

I would propose that entitlements should continue only for the means-tested retired and the disabled. As proposed, the changes would work as follows:

  • If you are retired, a criteria will be setup so that if you’re making under $250,000 per year or have a net worth of less than $2 million dollars, you will quality for entitlement funding, including Social Security and Medicare.
  • If you are disabled and also meet the previous criteria, you will receive entitlement funding.
  • If you are healthy and of working age, you will not qualify for welfare and other entitlement spending. Rather, you will be guaranteed a job through a government works program that provides a salary and health benefits.

It’s a simple and commonsense approach. If you don’t want money or insurance, you don’t have to work. If you do and can’t otherwise find a job, the government will provide one via public works. We have miles of roads, bridges and other structures that need repair and/or replacement. Our infrastructure has long been neglected. Our unemployment rate is above 9%. Now is the chance to fix both problems at the same time.

Under my plan, the person benefits and America benefits.

And to me, this makes a lot more sense than simply sending out welfare checks.

Perspective on the Tea Party – 4/15/10 in Washington, D.C.

"Granny is not shovel ready"

"A village in Kenya is missing it's idiot"

Well, I’m back from Washington, D.C. and the Tea Party rally on April 15th was… tame. I never heard racial slurs, and I didn’t see homophobic, racist or bigoted signs. What I did see was a number of people out to protest “high taxes”, “socialist government” and Obama in general. Overall, it was a peaceful protest of people exercising their first amendment right of assembly. However, I would like to point out that while they have the right to protest, they are often protesting factually inaccurate information. For example, income taxes for the middle class are at one of the the lowest levels in the last 50 years. Protesters suggesting that 95% of Americans didn’t get a tax cut under Obama are dead wrong. Continue reading

A Donkey at the Mad Hatter’s Tea Party

April 15th. Tax Day and Tea Party Rallies.

Since the Head Teabaggers will be migrating toward Washington, D.C. (see above for the video of this event), I guess I should do the same. I’ll be going not as a member of the Tea Party but as an observer. Political movements by their very nature are dynamic and filled with views and voices. I intend to hear some of these voices and gain a personal perspective on the movement. As they say, the best stories are often personalized stories and these experiences can be used towards another one of my projects. Continue reading

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